CaHRU team attends 999 EMS Research Forum conference in Bristol

EMS999_spaceSix members of the CaHRU team recently attended the 999 EMS Research Forum conference on Wednesday 29th March 2017 at the Bristol Science Centre. The team members attending were Professor Niro Siriwardena, Dr Zahid Asghar, Dr Stephanie Armstrong, Mr Viet-Hai Phung, Laura Simpson and Joseph Akanuwe.

Chiral_logoThe 999 EMS Research Forum is an international partnership bringing together academics and health-care providers with interest in emergency care research. The forum aims to encourage, promote and disseminate research and evidence-based policy and practice in prehospital healthcare. The conference, which was hosted by the South Western Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust, included keynote presentations, peer-reviewed presentations, moderated poster presentation sessions and the presentation of prizes and closing remarks.

999EMS_BengerThe conference theme was, “The way forward for Emergency care Research: Inclusion; Collaboration; Sustainability”. The morning was chaired by Professor Jonathan Benger. Keynote speakers included: Professor Ann John of Swansea University Medical School who discussed the emergency care of people who self-harm; Dr Sarah Voss of the University of the West of England, who discussed the social and cultural influences on the design and delivery of collaborative research in emergency care. Other keynote speakers were: Janette Turner of the University of Sheffield, who spoke on the “Ambulance Response Programme”; and Dr Andrew Appelboam with Alex Sharp who presented the, “REVERT to the future: Dissemination and Implementation” study. Last but not the least was Professor Steve Goodacre, Chair of the NIHR Health Technology Assessment Clinical Evaluation and Trials Board, who talked about the way forward with Health Technology Assessment and the HTA programme.

999EMS_CosterThere followed five interesting oral presentations of the highest rated peer-reviewed abstracts submitted. First, Jonathan Chippendale from the East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust, presented a pilot study to assess the feasibility of paramedics delivering antibiotics to ‘red flag’ sepsis patients. Next, Joanne Coster from the University of Sheffield talked about the multi-method consensus development of new ambulance service quality and performance measures. Dr Mathew Booker of the University of Bristol drew on early findings from their prehospital ethnographic study and discussed why primary care problems end up receiving ambulance treatment.

WP_20170328_17_49_05_RichThe moderated poster sessions involved a five minute presentation with two minutes for questions and answers per poster. Members of the CaHRU team presented high quality posters. Professor Niro Siriwardena led the poster presentation on: a reliability and validity of an Ambulance Patient Reported Experience Measure (A-PREM) pilot study. Dr Zahid Asghar presented the poster on a cross section study which explores factors increasing paramedics’ likelihood of administering analgesia in prehospital pain (EXPLAIN). Dr Stephanie Armstrong presented the poster on: consent as an ethical consideration in the conduct of prehospital ambulance randomised controlled clinical trials: a systematic review.

The conference proved interesting and worthwhile with opportunities to learn and meet potential research collaborators. The presentation of prizes to deserving winners and closing remarks brought the conference to a close.

By Joseph Akanuwe

Profile photo of Niroshan Siriwardena

About Niroshan Siriwardena

GP and professor of primary and prehospital health care

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