Improving Cardiac Arrest Recognition and Effectiveness (ICARE)

PROJECT TITLE IMPROVING CARDIAC ARREST RECOGNITION AND EFFECTIVENESS (ICARE)
Funding body National Institute for Health Research Policy Research Programme PR-ST-1014-00011
Total funding £595,408
Team
  • Prof Caroline Watkins, Clinical Practice Research Unit, University of Central Lancashire (CPRU, UCLAN)
  • Dr Michael Leathley, CPRU, UCLAN
  • Dr Stephanie Jones, CPRU, UCLAN
  • Dr Jo Gibson, CPRU, UCLAN
  • Dr Chris Sutton, Clinical Trials Unit, UCLAN
  • Dr Chris Price, Newcastle University
  • Prof A N Siriwardena, CaHRU, University of Lincoln
  • Dr David Roberts, Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Prof Tom Quinn, University of Surrey
  • Mr David Dewitt, Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Prof Kevin Mackway-Jones, North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust and Manchester Royal Infirmary
Team/consortium

University of Central Lancashire

Newcastle University

University of Lincoln

Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

University of Surrey

North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust and Manchester Royal Infirmary

Overarching aim The aim of this study is to explore whether the recognition of, and response to, out of hospital cardiac arrest by English ambulance services can be improved.
Objectives Primary objective

  • To explore and compare performance of dispatch systems (AMPDS and NHS Pathways) used by 999 call handlers for the recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and people at high risk of imminent cardiac arrest
  • To identify ‘key indicator’ words used by people making emergency calls relating to people in cardiac arrest or at high risk of imminent cardiac arrest and estimate their sensitivity and specificity
  • To synthesise the findings from the identification of the ‘key indicator’ words and the variables predictive of cardiac arrest to determine if it is possible to improve the accuracy of recognising out of hospital cardiac arrest and / or people at high risk of imminent cardiac arrest.
Methods Mixed methods
Outcomes

Recommendations to improve recognition of people in cardiac arrest and / or at high risk of imminent cardiac arrest

A model to examine the impact and economic consequences of implementing these recommendations.

Outputs Peer reviewed report, publications and conference presentations.
Impact Findings could lead to better recognition of patients in, and at risk of cardiac arrest, by 999 call handlers which may impact on out of hospital cardiac arrest survival. Better recognition of cardiac arrest could also improve service provision and resource use by reducing the number of inappropriate diversions of ambulances, and therefore delayed arrival at other urgent incidents.

 

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